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Breast Cancer Patient Stories

Shari Lynn

Breast Cancer

Shari Lynn

Breast Cancer

In 2002, Shari Lynn's husband, Mark, accepted a new job in another state. Together, Shari and Mark made the decision to move their family from New York to Pennsylvania. Shari was like many other moms in her situation. In preparing for the move, she scheduled routine doctor appointments on Long Island so they would not feel pressured to find new physicians right away.

Audrey Lam

Breast Cancer

Audrey Lam

Breast Cancer

Born in Hong Kong in 1957, Audrey Lam traveled to the United States as a young adult in order to further her education. After earning a doctoral degree in School Psychology, she was the first Chinese bilingual school psychologist to work in the School District of Philadelphia. In December 2010, at the age of 52, Audrey suddenly felt her world turn upside down when she was diagnosed with breast cancer (ductal carcinoma). Her doctor recommended a mastectomy with an option of immediate breast reconstruction. Audrey decided to ask for a second opinion.

Deb Kolanko

Breast Cancer

Deb Kolanko

Breast Cancer

Deb Kolanko truly believes that everything in life happens for a purpose and reason. On that note, she believes her cancer diagnosis was just part of her bigger plan. In June 2012, Deb was enjoying retirement and preparing for the birth of her first grandchild. “I was extremely busy with  life and the fun things it had to offer … family, friends, my puppies, and of course, planning for the little one who was due in June,” said Deb, who added “life could not get any better.” Her beautiful granddaughter Madeleine was born on June 13.

Nicole Holtz

Breast Cancer

Nicole Holtz

Breast Cancer

"I was diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ in November 2010, after undergoing several biopsies and a lumpectomy at my local hospital. Even with that treatment, I continued to have discharge from my breast, and the surgeon said he had not gotten all of the cancer."

Ruth Sklar

Breast Cancer

Ruth Sklar

Breast Cancer

I received some bad news and some good news after a routine mammogram in June 2005. The bad news was that I had ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the most common type of noninvasive breast cancer. The good news was that it had not spread.

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