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Breast Cancer Patient Stories

Renee Dratch

Breast Cancer

Renee Dratch

Breast Cancer

At 41 years old, I was diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the most common type of noninvasive breast cancer. It was July 2011.

Janet Blair

Breast Cancer

Janet Blair

Breast Cancer

I was 62 years old in January 2014 when a routine mammogram detected a cluster of calcifications in my left breast. Further testing showed that I had stage 3 breast cancer. I was scared and knew I needed to make some decisions.

Linda Snow

Breast Cancer

Linda Snow

Breast Cancer

Linda Snow was active, maintained a healthy diet, and underwent genetic testing, followed by two double mastectomies and a hysterectomy. So she was shocked that even with all of these precautionary procedures that she still got breast cancer. Linda sought treatment at Fox Chase Cancer Center, where she met with her treatment team. After a long road, she is now cancer free and credits her survival to Fox Chase. "Where you start your cancer treatment really does make a difference," said Linda. "You have got to act with a sense of urgency because it can mean the difference between life and death. I unequivocally believe that I am alive today because I chose Fox Chase."

Karen Lucas

Breast Cancer

Karen Lucas

Breast Cancer

For more than 20 years, I had been diligent about getting annual mammograms, as well as yearly visits to my OB/GYN. At 65 years old, during a routine mammogram in August 2012, my test showed calcification in both my breasts.

Denise Portner

Breast Cancer

Denise Portner

Breast Cancer

In May 2008, Denise Portner, 45, underwent genetic testing that showed she carried the BRCA2 mutation, just like her mother and aunt, who had breast cancer. Genetic counselors at this hospital advised her to consider prophylactic oophorectomy, a surgical procedure to remove one or both of her ovaries to help reduce her risk for breast and ovarian cancers. Denise decided to get a second opinion from the Risk Assessment Program at Fox Chase Cancer Center, and on June 16, 2009, she learned that she had breast cancer, which changed her treatment plans. Instead, she had a double mastectomy that summer, followed by chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and, later, the originally planned oophorectomy. "It was a challenging ride, but I always felt that I was getting the best possible treatment and that I was fortunate to have a world-class cancer center within a 10-minute drive of my home," Denise said. "If I had not been aware of my genetic status, I would not have had the MRI and would not have known that I had breast cancer."

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