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Cihangir Duy Receives Grant to Investigate the Effect of LSD1 Inhibitors on ‘Dormant’ Leukemia Cells

November 9, 2021

Cihangir Duy, PhD, MS, an assistant professor in the Cancer Signaling and Epigenetics Program at Fox Chase Cancer Center, awarded grant from The Leukemia Research Foundation.Cihangir Duy, PhD, MS, an assistant professor in the Cancer Signaling and Epigenetics Program at Fox Chase Cancer Center, awarded grant from The Leukemia Research Foundation.

PHILADELPHIA (November 9, 2021)—Cihangir Duy, PhD, MS, an assistant professor in the Cancer Signaling and Epigenetics Program at Fox Chase Cancer Center, has been awarded a one-year $100,000 Hollis Brownstein Research Grant from The Leukemia Research Foundation. The grant will fund research into how certain acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells can reactivate following chemotherapy, thus causing disease relapse.

“This grant comes at a very exciting time for our research,” said Duy, who is also a member of the Cancer Epigenetics Institute at Fox Chase. “We will advance our investigations into the biology of acute myeloid leukemia and hope to make further breakthroughs in the development of improved treatments.”

During his postdoctoral research, Duy observed that while most active AML cells are killed during chemotherapy, some go into a “dormant” state and then reactivate. This dormant state resembles senescence, a state of cellular aging in which cells lose their ability to grow and divide.

Duy found that the protein LSD1 plays a role in this process and the grant will support further research into the effectiveness of LSD1 inhibitors in improving remission rates of patients following chemotherapy.

Relapse is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in AML patients. Duy believes that targeting senescence pathways that support survival of leukemia cells following chemotherapy will lead to better therapeutics and reduce the potential of relapse.

The Leukemia Research Foundation provides the Hollis Brownstein Research Grants to fund critical blood cancer research by providing one-year grants to scientists who are establishing their own laboratories and are no longer under the tutelage of a senior scientist mentor. The foundation believes that supporting this critical research niche fosters new and innovative ideas that lead to significant breakthroughs and develops the next generation of scientific leaders.

The Hospital of Fox Chase Cancer Center and its affiliates (collectively “Fox Chase Cancer Center”), a member of the Temple University Health System, is one of the leading cancer research and treatment centers in the United States. Founded in 1904 in Philadelphia as one of the nation’s first cancer hospitals, Fox Chase was also among the first institutions to be designated a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center in 1974. Fox Chase researchers have won the highest awards in their fields, including two Nobel Prizes. Fox Chase physicians are also routinely recognized in national rankings, and the Center’s nursing program has received the Magnet recognition for excellence five consecutive times. Today, Fox Chase conducts a broad array of nationally competitive basic, translational, and clinical research, with special programs in cancer prevention, detection, survivorship and community outreach. It is the policy of Fox Chase Cancer Center that there shall be no exclusion from, or participation in, and no one denied the benefits of, the delivery of quality medical care on the basis of race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity/expression, disability, age, ancestry, color, national origin, physical ability, level of education, or source of payment.

 

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