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Cancer Epigenetics

Jean-Pierre Issa, co-leader of cancer epigenetics is a research professor at the Temple University School of Medicine working in collaboration with Fox Chase researchers to conduct basic and translational research in the field of cancer epigenetics.Jean-Pierre Issa, co-leader of cancer epigenetics is a research professor at the Temple University School of Medicine working in collaboration with Fox Chase researchers to conduct basic and translational research in the field of cancer epigenetics.

The new Cancer Epigenetics (CE) program has basic, translational and clinical components, all dedicated to a better understanding of epigenetic (de)regulation in cancer, and plans for using this information to improve diagnosis, prognosis and outcomes for various malignancies.

We bring together investigators to accomplish translational research goals through biomarker studies and clinical trials. The program takes advantage of the breadth and depth of faculty expertise in cancer epigenetics arising from the merger between FCCC and Temple and is recruiting more scientists in key areas.

Our goal is to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with cancer by focusing on biomarker research and therapeutic interventions. The translational research goals focus on biomarkers for early detection of a range of cancers (e.g. bladder cancer), risk assessment (breast, colon and bladder cancer), predicting outcomes (leukemias, GU malignancies, etc.), biomarkers of specific drug response (leukemias, bladder cancer), pre-clinical studies of epigenetic therapy (various malignancies) and clinical trials of epigenetic therapy (leukemias). CE emphasizes identification and validation of new anti-cancer drug targets using well-established targets (DNMTs, PARP1, EZH2), and emerging targets (FACT, TDG, TETs). The basic research goals are to better understand epigenetic regulation from both a systems approach (development/disease) and a molecular mechanisms approach (transcription, enhancers, DNA methylation and demethylation, etc.).

Multidisciplinary teams work to develop and implement state-of-the-art approaches for translating basic science developments into the clinic.