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Betty Bishop

Help that Honors

Betty Bishop says she cried when she heard what her husband Reggie Bishop had done.

She had known he was going to make a donation to Fox Chase in honor of their late niece, Kimberly Miller Eline. She just didn’t know it was going to be a gift significant enough to keep Kimberly’s name alive at Fox Chase in perpetuity.

“Reg said he just felt like we needed to do something so everyone would know how wonderful she was,” Betty says. Today, there’s a conference room on the fourth floor of the Robert C. Young, M.D., Pavilion—a Fox Chase research, treatment, and prevention hub—named in Kimberly’s honor. The oldest daughter of Betty’s brother, Robert Miller, Kimberly was the first grandchild in their family and served as flower girl in Reggie and Betty’s wedding. At the time of her death from breast cancer in 2011, Kimberly was the mother of three children, ages 17, 19, and 22.

 “Reg said he just felt like we needed to do something.”

Reggie Bishop still chokes up when he talks about his niece. “The thing that really helped was that she was at Fox Chase,” he says. “They helped her live an almost normal life.”

Reggie and Betty have been longtime contributors to the Bucks County Chapter of the Fox Chase Board of Associates, a fundraising group. Now they’ve increased their support with generous annual gifts to Fox Chase research.

That funding is directed to immunologist David L. Wiest, whose laboratory explores the formation of leukemia and lymphoma, as well as the pathways through which cancers, including pancreatic cancer, turn metastatic.

Wiest says the benefit of the Bishops’ donation goes beyond his laboratory, allowing him to create tools other researchers can use. For instance, the money funds the development of mice with unique mutations that will allow researchers to study how cancers spread by metastases. The Bishops’ funding also supports research to identify genes important to the development of immune cells called T lymphocytes, which play a role in lymphoma and leukemia.

“Reggie and Betty are truly special people whose generosity enables researchers like me to do the kind of high-risk, high-impact research that can make a big difference,” Wiest says.

Reggie Bishop says of his motivation, "I thought I should help more. Fox Chase is one of my top priorities."  

2012